The BA Guide Blog

Bringing you the very best in educational, engaging, and insightful articles, and business analysis industry news. Here, we keep learning approachable and accessible while providing helpful, practical information to help you excel in your career.

The COVID-19 pandemic created deep ripple effects that were far-reaching in virtually every industry. Not only were supply chains affected, but employees at companies all over the world re-evaluated...

We all want to feel fulfilled in what we do for a living, in the job we work day to day. I found fulfillment in being a Business Analyst (BA) and, now, as a coach who helps ambitious and prospective BAs break through barriers, thrive in their professional development, and open doors for their futures. In this article, I’ll highlight why the BA role is such an appealing career path, so you can decide if it’s the right move for you too! And if it is, I’ll also throw in a little guidance on how you can get started.
The world is in a constant state of change, and as it evolves, trends and demand shift, technology progresses at lightning speed, and external factors such as natural disasters, political instability, and pandemics can significantly impact the supply of goods and services, as well as their cost. This is one of the biggest reasons why innovation has always been a coveted and crucial quality of any successful business.
Rarely do people take a moment to learn the origins of their professions - let alone pinpoint the exact events that were the inspiration for its creation. Luckily, we can do this with the Business Analyst role! Still a somewhat modern role, we can trace the BA role back to its very beginnings and can even identify the problem that inspired the role and allowed organizations to see the value that BAs bring when enacting change.  Let’s take a few minutes to recognize the genesis of the Business Analyst role and the circumstances that inspired it.

The COVID-19 pandemic created deep ripple effects that were far-reaching in virtually every industry. Not only were supply chains affected, but employees at companies all over the world re-evaluated their careers and how they spend the majority of their time.

This led to what we now refer to as ‘the Great Resignation’, with professionals everywhere leaving their current jobs in droves. Ever since this professional exodus - which kicked off in the spring of 2021 - an increase in demand for Business Analysts was created. Professionals across the United States are taking this opportunity to be more selective about

What would the Business Analyst role be without a commitment to constant improvement and evolution? A little hypocritical, probably. This ability to embrace change and work nimbly are assets for any BA, which makes the Agile methodology a crucial framework for all of us.

In this article, we’ll examine the importance of the agile methodology for Business Analysts, why it’s beneficial (for each party) if we work in an Agile framework, and how to become certified as an Agile BA.

If you’re brand new to Agile, please don’t be intimidated. I break it all down in my <a href="https://courses.thebaguide.com/p/agile-fundamentals-scrum-kanban-scrumban/?product_id=1050339&coupon_code=UPSKILL2DAY1X4O"

When it comes to embarking on a new journey, it helps to have a little guidance to shine a light on the path ahead, to help with clarifying confusing concepts and jargon, and give you a little confidence when you’re questioning yourself.

In case you’re new here - and to the Business Analyst role, in general - I’m Jeremy Aschenbrenner, also known as The BA Guide, and I’m so glad you’re here! The inspiration behind why I created The BA Guide was to help aspiring BA’s start their career off on the right foot and to help ambitious BA’s

Some people will observe Business Analysts from an outsider perspective and assume that we’re pretty much just glorified note-takers. But not everyone experiences all of the complex, intricate exercises and initiatives occurring in the background.

Being a Business Analyst is, at its core, about creating value for organizations. It’s about facing challenges, head on, with logic and learned techniques to help you figure out the root cause of problems at the business and create solutions that help the business and its employees thrive.

These days, corporations are under exceedingly greater pressure to refine their processes, increase productivity and efficiency in their operations, and maximize the return on any investment they make - and quickly!

With all of these expectations mounting, it comes as no surprise that when a company enlists the help of a Business Analyst to assist their team and take the lead on these somewhat daunting initiatives, they’re usually on the lookout for a candidate who comes with a rich, diverse background and a unique skill set that can be leveraged to satisfy a range of needs.

If you’ve been doing your research, you’ll know that being a Business Analyst is a pretty enticing career. As the demand and realization of value of the role continues to grow, an increasing number of professionals are flocking to it, leading to increased competition.

One of the best ways an aspiring Business Analyst can improve their candidacy for potential positions is by getting a professional business analysis certification. Since there is no formal education or career pathway to the job, achieving a respectied and credible certification can really help in bolstering your skills and highlighting your knowledge

With the variety of challenges that Business Analysts face throughout the span of their career, one of the most valuable skills that one must possess is the ability to solve problems in a logical and analytical way. This crucial skill can be extremely difficult to judge on paper, though, so it is very common for Business Analysts interviewing for a new role to be tested with some behavioral interview questions.

While this type of questioning may seem daunting at first, understanding its purpose and a little more about how to approach behavioral interview questions can help take the edge